1/23
Competition provisions in regional trade agreements: How to assure development gains / UNCTAD; Naciones Unidas .--New York : Naciones Unidas; UNCTAD, 2005.-- 490 p.
ISBN GE.05-52313
COMPETENCIAS COMERCIALES   SOCIEDADES CIVILES   PROMOCION CULTURAL   PROTECCION AL CONSUMIDOR   NEGOCIACIONES COMERCIALES Categoría temática primaria COOPERACION REGIONAL   ACUERDOS COMERCIALES  
Categoría geográfica: EUROPA   COREA   CARIBE   AFRICA   CHILE   MEXICO   AUSTRALIA   TANZANIA   ZAMBIA   MALAWI  
Solicite el material por este código: BB-2012

    In recent years, regional trade agreements have been proliferating among and between developed and developing countries. Currently there are around 300 bilateral and regional agreements, of which more than 100 contain commitments on competition policies with implications at both regional and national level. To date, little is known about the impact and role of such regional initiatives and there is growing awareness among developing countries, including the least developed countries (LDCs), of their special needs in this area.
    Along with many other UNCTAD research and technical cooperation activities over more than three decades in the competition policy field, this publication is a contribution to address these needs and implement UNCTAD’s mandate. UNCTAD was mandated in Paragraph 104 of the São Paulo Consensus to further strengthen analytical work and capacity building activities to assist developing countries on issues related to competition law and policies, including at a regional level. In response to this strengthened mandate, the publication covers a wide range of regional experience that should lead to a better understanding of competition provisions in RTAs for trade and competition policy makers and authorities that implement such policies.
    With its focus on regional trade agreements, this book complements last year’s publication Competition, Competitiveness and Development: Lessons from Developing Countries , which was launched at UNCTAD XI.
    The chapters collected in this publication shed light on the competition provisions found in different types of RTAs in order to support and guide policy makers on the negotiation and implementation of regional and bilateral agreements with respect to competition policies. The publication makes a number of policy recommendations and identifies institutional arrangements needed to promote synergies between trade and competition at regional level.
    A fundamental message to be derived from the empirical findings and policy experiences presented in the publication is that competition provisions at regional level can act as a major complement to the current efforts to develop an open, rule-based, predictable, non-discriminatory trading system, with a fair distribution of benefits for all developing countries.



2/23
Getting it righ. Emerging markets for storing carbon in forests. / Michael Totten .--Washington, D.C. : Forest Trends; World Resources Institute, 1999.-- 48 p.
ISBN 1-56973-413-5
CAMBIO CLIMATICO   EMISIONES DE CARBONO   EMISIONES DE GAS   FENOMENO EL NIÑO   PROTOCOLO DE KIOTO   PROTECCION AMBIENTAL   MERCADOS EMERGENTES Categoría temática primaria DESARROLLO SOSTENIBLE   MEDIO AMBIENTE  
Categoría geográfica: AMERICA LATINA   BELIZE   MALASIA   ESTADOS UNIDOS   RUSIA   AUSTRALIA  
Solicite el material por este código: BB-1189

    A scientific consensus that rising levels of greenhouse gas emissions are changing the world's climate has triggered wide-ranging reactions in the marketplace and in international politics. In hurricane zones and areas affected by El Niño risks from abnormal weather are rising, and insurance companies are raising their rates. Increasing numbers of Fortune 500 companies are adopting emission reduction plans. The Kyoto Protocol on Climate Change is working to create a regulated market for some 1 billion tons a year in carbon reductions, and corporations and national governments are building emissions trading systems to take advantage of that market. GHG emissions rapidly disperse into the planet's atmosphere, unlike smog pollutants, which tend to hover over local air sheds (e.g., Los Angeles, Bangkok, Mexico City). Two implications follow from this: it does not matter where emissions are reduced on the planet, any reduction anywhere is equally valuable; and if it is cheaper to reduce emissions somewhere else in the world, seek out this least-cost option. These insights, along with the huge successes achieved in sulfur, lead, and CFC trading to comply with stringent regulations, have been the driving force behind the concept of international emission trading. This concept was also included in the Kyoto Protocol and pending U.S. legislation on credit for early action.
    A significant market is emerging in ways to reduce greenhouse emissions-or store carbon to offset them. By acting now, your company may be able to reduce its risk exposure, hedge against future risks, prevent future costs, capture cost savings, and even develop new revenue streams. Furthermore, by being an early mover on this issue, your company can turn disadvantages into a competitive advantage by helping to shape the value chain as markets and policies continue to evolve. In a changing world market the best defense remains an intelligent offense. Applying current and emerging market opportunities could significantly enhance your company's strategic and tactical ability to compete in a carbon-constrained business environment. Getting It Right is designed to explain why and how companies should engage in this issue, looking specifically at the importance of forests in this new market. Forests offer one of the most cost-effective opportunities for storing or sequestering carbon. This report is directly relevant to companies in any industry-not just forest products. Indeed, there are clear co-benefits to be gained from companies interested in carbon offsets, and forestland managers and conservationists in temperate and tropical settings in need of financial support.
    This report is also an introduction to Forest Trends, a new organization that can help you with the tools your company will need to move forward. There are several questions you should ask yourself about the business opportunities of climate change. This report will address them:
    What evidence is there that there is a major market transformation underway?
    What assurances do I have that this is a long-term market, not a passing trend?
    Where are the best business opportunities?
    What options does my company have to capture these opportunities?
    Where are the risks from this strategy, and can we effectively manage them?
    What should be our next steps?

Documento a texto completo



3/23
Enviromental Risk Management. / Environment Protection Agency .--Brisbane : Environment Protection Agency, 1999.-- 78 p..- Serie: Best Practice Environmental Management in Mining
ISBN 0-642-546304
RIESGO AMBIENTAL   GERENCIA AMBIENTAL   PLANIFICACION EMPRESARIAL   PROTECCION AMBIENTAL   RECURSOS MINERALES   IMPACTO AMBIENTAL   GESTION AMBIENTAL   INDUSTRIA MINERA Categoría temática primaria DESARROLLO SOSTENIBLE   PROTECCION AMBIENTAL  
Categoría geográfica: AUSTRALIA  
Solicite el material por este código: BB-1275

    This booklet addresses the principles of applying environmental risk management (EMR) to the overall management of environmental issues associated with mining operations and related activities. It also aims o provide practical advice to those responsible for planning, developing, operating and regulating mining activities on the best way to apply risk management to protect the environment and efficiently allocate resources.
    The management of risk is inherent in all our daily activities. Almost every action we take, or do not take, affects our risk exposure. Choices over simple day-to-day things, such as what we eat, how we travel, what physical activity we engage in, or how much sleep we get, can directly influence the type, consequences and likelihood of adverse outcomes.



4/23
Water management. / Environment Protection Agency .--Brisbane : Environment Protection Agency, 1999.-- 94 p..- Serie: Best Practice Environmental Management in Mining
ISBN 0-642-546231
CONTAMINACION AMBIENTAL   CONTAMINACION DEL AGUA   CONTAMINACION MINERA   GERENCIA AMBIENTAL   IMPACTO AMBIENTAL   EXPLOTACION MINERA   INDUSTRIA MINERA   RIESGO AMBIENTAL   AGUA Categoría temática primaria DESARROLLO SOSTENIBLE   GESTION AMBIENTAL  
Categoría geográfica: AUSTRALIA  
Solicite el material por este código: BB-1281

    Environmental best practice is about preventing or (where this is not possible) minimising environmental impacts. Water is integral to virtually all mining activities and typically the prime medium, besides air, that can carry pollutants into the wider environment. Consequently, sound water management and practice are fundamental for most mining operations to achieve environmental best practice.
    At most mine sites, ore extraction and processing, workforce health and safety, and rehabilitation, all require water. Achieving best practice environmental water management relies on companies implementing an integrated 'cradle to grave' approach at every stage of the mine operation. Because mine planning, by necessity, is typically based on limited data, initial predictions are validated during the early operational phase. The water management system needs to be adjusted to ensure water management principles are applied.
    Periodic risk/ consequence assessments can help check the effectiveness of the water management system. This not only minimises the risk of impacts on the surrounding environment during the operational phase but also helps 'fine tune' rehabilitation planning. This in turn maximises potentially beneficial post- mining land uses and therefore reduces potential liabilities.
    Developing water management systems for a mine must account for site-specific physical, chemical and climatic characteristics as well as mine process factors. Total company commitment is fundamental to ensuring best-practice water management minimises potential environmental impacts. This booklet presents the key principles of best practice environmental management for water systems.
    Best practice principles and approaches have developed rapidly in the past few years. A growing number of Australian mining operations can demonstrate best practice across their operations. A series of case studies in this booklet shows best practice for specific components of individual operations. Further reading covering mine water management is provided.



5/23
Noise, vibration and airblast control. / Environment Protection Agency .--Brisbane : Environment Protection Agency, 1998.-- 58 p..- Serie: Best Practice Environmental Management in Mining
ISBN 0-642-54510-3
IMPACTO AMBIENTAL   GERENCIA AMBIENTAL   PLANIFICACION AMBIENTAL   EXPLOTACION MINERA   INDUSTRIA MINERA Categoría temática primaria DESARROLLO SOSTENIBLE   MEDIO AMBIENTE  
Categoría geográfica: AUSTRALIA  
Solicite el material por este código: BB-1282

    Noise, vibration and airblast are among the most significant issues for communities located near mining projects. The growth in public awareness and expectations of environmental performance has led mining companies to focus their attention on the potential impacts arising from noise, vibration and airblast generated by mining activities.
    Best practice environmental management of noise, vibration and airblast involves a three staged approach incorporating:
    -Impact Assessments-identifies potential impacts and mitigation methods including optimisation of the mine layout or the way in which the exploration program is conducted.
    -Management Plans-establishes the existing environmental conditions and details the methods for monitoring and complying with the mine's environmental objectives.
    -Monitoring and Audit Programs- assures the Management Plan and quality objectives are verified.
    The first step in implementing best practice is to conduct an environmental impact assessment that examines the proposal in detail and identifies all the potential sources of noise, vibration and airblast impact. After establishing existing environmental conditions within a potentially affected community, quality objectives are set for assessing adverse impacts. Where this assessment shows that the predetermined design goals will be exceeded, coasted mitigation measures are incorporated which will enable impacts to be effectively reduced.
    Developing a Management Plan for noise, vibration and airblast emissions is the second step of best practice. The Management Plan demonstrates the mining company's commitment to achieving environmental goals. The detailed design of noise and blast mitigation measures arises from implementing the Management Plan.



6/23
Dust control. / Environment Protection Agency .--Brisbane : Environment Protection Agency, 1998.-- 73 p..- Serie: Best Practice Environmental Management in Mining
ISBN 0-642-54570-7
SALUD AMBIENTAL   IMPACTO AMBIENTAL   EXPLOTACION MINERA   INDUSTRIA MINERA   CONTAMINACION AMBIENTAL   RIESGO AMBIENTAL Categoría temática primaria DESARROLLO SOSTENIBLE   GESTION AMBIENTAL  
Categoría geográfica: AUSTRALIA  
Solicite el material por este código: BB-1283

    Dust is an inevitable problem for almost ill forms of mining. It is one of the most visible, invasive and potentially irritating impacts, and it's visibility often raises concerns which are not necessarily in direct proportion to its impact on human health and the environment. However, many dusts do contain metals which are potentially hazardous, and certain types of dust particles are known to cause particular diseases. It has the potential to severely effect flora and fauna near the mine and to impact on the health of mine workers. Clearly dust requires special attention.
    Dust results from blasting, handling, processing or transporting soil and rock or can arise from bare or poorly vegetated areas in combination with air movements. The level of dust generated, its behaviour (travel distance), and types of health and environmental risks depend on many factors including mine type, local climate, topography, working methods and types of equipment used, the mineralogy and metallurgical characteristics of some ores, and the inherent character and/ or landuse of the area around the mine.
    The control of dust must be a fundamental part of any environmental management plan because of the increasing public awareness of human health issues and expectations of environmental performance, and the duty of care required of mine operators by government and the community.
    The challenge for mining companies is to adopt a dust management system which recognises and responds to the issue of dust emissions at all stages of mining from mine planning and operation through to mine closure. This includes systematically identifying sources, predicting dust levels, evaluating potential effects on human health and the environment, and incorporating prediction and control measures. Implementing an effective community consultation process is essential.
    Such a 'whole of mine life' dust management system has benefits for the mining company and the wider community. It can result in cost savings, increased profits, and improved government and community relations, as well as easier access to resources and financial support in the future.
    Case studies in this booklet have been chosen to demonstrate best management principles in action. Best practice in dust management uses new techniques in monitoring and control, and encourages a pro-active, educative, community consultation approach to dust issues. It uses predictive technology, such as dust modelling coupled with robust climatic and real time data, to identify and mitigate likely dust events.
    Dust does not need to be an occupational or environmental hazard as it is within the operator's scope to manage. The success of best practice dust management depends on a joint commitment by management and workers to adopt dust control techniques which recognise and respond to the potential health and environmental impacts, and are sympathetic to the concerns of neighbouring communities.



7/23
Landform design for rehabilitation. / Environment Protection Agency .--Brisbane : Environment Protection Agency, 1998.-- 74 p..- Serie: Best Practice Environmental Management in Mining
ISBN 0-642-54546-4
PLANIFICACION AMBIENTAL   EXPLOTACION MINERA   SUELOS   GERENCIA DE PRODUCCION   GERENCIA AMBIENTAL Categoría temática primaria DESARROLLO SOSTENIBLE   INDUSTRIA MINERA  
Categoría geográfica: AUSTRALIA  
Solicite el material por este código: BB-1277

    This booklet describes why designing the eventual landform and progressively and efficiently managing the mine, rock dumps and tailings facilities to achieve it, must be part of the mine planning process. In the past, land reshaping was only considered at the completion of mining when rehabilitation was beginning. The need to extensively reshape areas disturbed by mining and waste disposal can be minimised through effective mine planning and management. The advantages are that the optimal post- mining land use is readily achieved, and that the cost of rehabilitation to the miner can be dramatically reduced.
    This booklet demonstrates how mine planning can integrate an ongoing process of landform reshaping enabling progressive rehabilitation at minimal cost to the operator. The booklet outlines the steps from pre- mining to the decommissioning stage which make land reshaping part of the normal day-to-day operations of the mine.
    The planning and the physical processes revolve around the final land use for the site. There must be agreement on the long term post- mining land use objective for the area with the relevant government authorities, local government councils, and where applicable traditional owners or the private landowner.
    The final land use must be compatible with community needs, any legal requirements, climate, soils, and the local topography, and the degree of management available after rehabilitation. This aspect is covered in detail in the booklet in this series entitled Rehabilitation and Revegetation. Because of its impact on mine planning, it is critical to determine the final land use early in the mine design.



8/23
Payment systems, monetary policy, and the role of the Central Bank. / Omotunde Johnson .--Washington, D.C. : FMI, 1998.-- 254 p.
ISBN 1-55775-626-0
REFORMAS ECONOMICAS   CREDITOS FINANCIEROS Categoría temática primaria POLITICA MONETARIA   BANCA  
Categoría geográfica: AUSTRALIA   FRANCIA   POLONIA   RUSIA   TAILANDIA   ESTADOS UNIDOS  
Solicite el material por este código: BB-1589

    A payment system encompasses a set of instruments and means generally acceptable in making payments; the institutional and organizational framework governing such payments, including prudential regulation; and the operating procedures and communications network used to initiate and transmit payment information from payer to payee and to settle payments. This book, by Omotunde E.G. Johnson, with Richard K. Abrams, Jean-Marc Destresse, Tony Lybek, Nicholas Roberts, and Mark Swinburne, identifies main policy and strategic issues in payment system reform, describes the structure of payment systems in selected countries, highlights areas of consensus, and suggests the direction for future policy analysis.



9/23
El futuro de las relaciones comerciales y de inversión entre Australia y América del Sur. / Tim Fischer.-- pp. 78-184..-- En: Capítulos del SELA / SELA.-- Caracas, No. 50 (Abr.- Jun. 1997)
RELACIONES BILATERALES   RELACIONES COMERCIALES   INVERSIONES EXTRANJERAS Categoría temática primaria RELACIONES INTERNACIONALES   RELACIONES ECONOMICAS INTERNACIONALES  
Categoría geográfica: AMERICA DEL SUR   AUSTRALIA  
Solicite el material por este código: PP-3185

    Discurso del Viceprimer Ministro y Ministro de Comercio de Australia, pronunciado en Sydney el 16 de mayo de 1997 ante la Comisión para el Desarrollo Económico de Australia, con motivo de la presentación de un estudio sobre el futuro de las relaciones comerciales y de inversión entre Australia y América del Sur.

Capítulos del SELA  Existencias



10/23
Hazardous materials Management, Storage and Disposal. / Environment Protection Agency .--Brisbane : Environment Protection Agency, 1997.-- 72 p..- Serie: Best Practice Environmental Management in Mining
ISBN 0-642-19448-3
MATERIALES PELIGROSOS   SALUD AMBIENTAL   PROTECCION AMBIENTAL   RIESGO AMBIENTAL   EXPLOTACION MINERA   INDUSTRIA MINERA   IMPACTO AMBIENTAL Categoría temática primaria DESARROLLO SOSTENIBLE   GESTION AMBIENTAL  
Categoría geográfica: AUSTRALIA  
Solicite el material por este código: BB-1279

    A hazardous material is one which, as a result of its physical, chemical or other properties, poses a hazard to human health or the environment when it is improperly handled, used, treated, stored, disposed of or otherwise managed. Principles for best practice management of hazardous materials to minimise or prevent their environmental impacts are:
    -identify and prepare materials and waste inventories;
    -characterise potential environmental hazards posed by these materials;
    -describe methods for transport, storage, handling and use;
    -identify options for disposal and long term storage;
    -prepare contingency and emergency response plans; and
    -obtain commitment of management to ensure training of management, workers and contractors whose responsibilities include handling hazardous materials.
    Hazardous materials are used at most mining and mineral processing operations in Australia. Many waste products generated by these operations can be hazardous to human health and the environment. Best practice environmental management requires that the risk of environmental damage from accidental releases of hazardous materials is minimised through:
    -knowing which hazardous materials are on site;
    -allocating clear responsibility for managing hazardous materials;
    -understanding the actual or potential hazards and environmental impacts in transporting, storing, using and disposing of these materials;
    -minimising the use and! or generation of hazardous materials;
    -constructing storage facilities that contain the materials in all foreseen circumstances;
    -disposing of waste materials in a way that eliminates or minimises environmental impacts;
    -seeking alternatives to disposal, such as reduce, reuse, recycle and secondary products;
    -implementing physical controls and procedural measures to ensure that no materials escape during normal or abnormal operations;
    -having emergency response plans in place to ensure immediate action to minimise the environmental effects should accidental or unplanned releases occur;
    -monitoring any discharges and also the environment to detect any escapes of the materials and measure any subsequent impacts; and
    -keeping adequate records and reviewing them regularly so future environmental problems are anticipated and avoided.



11/23
Managing sulphidic mine wastes and acid drainage. / Environment Protection Agency .--Brisbane : Environment Protection Agency, 1997.-- 84 p..- Serie: Best Practice Environmental Management in Mining
ISBN 0-642-19449-1
GERENCIA AMBIENTAL   DESECHOS TOXICOS   IMPACTO AMBIENTAL   PROTECCION AMBIENTAL   EXPLOTACION MINERA   INDUSTRIA MINERA Categoría temática primaria DESARROLLO SOSTENIBLE   GESTION AMBIENTAL  
Categoría geográfica: AUSTRALIA  
Solicite el material por este código: BB-1280

    This booklet addresses environmental management to avoid or minimise potential environmental impacts associated with the oxidation of sulphidic mine wastes produced by mine excavation and processing. These oxidation processes are traditionally referred to in Australia as acid mine drainage (AMD) and in North America as acid rock drainage (ARD). Acid drainage is used in this document to refer to all issues associated with the actual and potential environmental effects of sulphide oxidation resulting from mining activities. Acid drainage is one of the most significant environmental issues facing the mining industry. It affects most sectors of the industry including coal, precious metals, base metals and uranium.
    Experience to date has shown that its effects include acid drainage from waste rock stockpiles and tailings residue emplacements (impacting on downstream water quality), development of acid conditions in exposed surface materials (potentially affecting rehabilitation), increased solubility and! or release of metals (irrespective of actual pH) and increased salinity or solute loads (oxidation and neutralisation products).
    Ferguson and Erickson (see Further Reading) note that acid drainage arises from rapid oxidation of sulphide minerals, and often occurs where such minerals are exposed to the atmosphere by excavation from the earth's crust. Road cuts, quarries, or other rock excavations can expose these minerals, but metalliferous mines are a primary source since economically recoverable metals often occur as orebodies of concentrated metal sulphides (for example, (iron) pyrite, Fe S2; (copper) chalcopyrite, CuFeS2; (zinc) sphalerite, ZnS). The production of acid sulphate soils, a major problem throughout coastal areas of the world, is also a result of the oxidation of pyrite in soil of marine and estuarine origins.
    The environmental consequences of acid drainage can be substantial. For example, in the United States an estimated 20 000 km of streams and rivers are affected by acid drainage which has a deleterious effect on aquatic life in streams and in some cases precludes their beneficial use by other water users. Significant impacts on groundwater and soil can also occur as a result of mine derived acid drainage.
    In 1994 the Canadian Mine Environment Neutral Drainage Program (MEND) estimated the cost of remediating acid generating mine wastes in Canada to be in excess of $3 billion.
    The impact of acid drainage in Australia has not been fully quantified and the cost of remediation is unknown.



12/23
Onshore Minerals and Petroleum Exploration. / Environment Protection Agency .--Brisbane : Environment Protection Agency, 1996.-- 60 p..- Serie: Best Practice Environmental Management in Mining
ISBN 0-642-19437-8
IMPACTO AMBIENTAL   EDUCACION AMBIENTAL   PROTECCION AMBIENTAL   EXPLOTACION MINERA   EXPLOTACION PETROLERA   INDUSTRIA MINERA Categoría temática primaria DESARROLLO SOSTENIBLE   MEDIO AMBIENTE  
Categoría geográfica: AUSTRALIA  
Solicite el material por este código: BB-1276

    This module discusses potential environmental impacts that can arise during various stages of exploration activities and management of those impacts. Environmental impacts can be minimised through participation of stakeholders, personnel training, selection, use and timing of appropriate equipment.
    Effective practical techniques to restore the environment at the completion of exploration activities are also discussed. Case studies are included to demonstrate how the best practice principles have been applied at a number of sites in Australia. An environmental checklist is presented as an appendix to assist people in the field.



13/23
Enviromental Auditing. / Environment Protection Agency .--Brisbane : Environment Protection Agency, 1996.-- 64 p..- Serie: Best Practice Environmental Management in Mining
ISBN 0-642-19438-6
PLANIFICACION AMBIENTAL   PLANIFICACION FINANCIERA   PROTECCION AMBIENTAL   RIESGO AMBIENTAL   EXPLOTACION MINERA   AUDITORIA AMBIENTAL Categoría temática primaria DESARROLLO SOSTENIBLE   INDUSTRIA MINERA  
Categoría geográfica: AUSTRALIA  
Solicite el material por este código: BB-1285

    For today's mining industry, regulations, financial reporting requirements, market competition and community expectations require environmental performance to be assessed and reported. This has led both industry and government to adopt the environmental audit process.
    The word audit is generally associated with financial reviews, carried out by accounting professionals under strict rules that establish the responsibilities and liabilities of the auditors. There are no such rules for environmental auditing.
    With increased awareness of the need for environment protection, the mining industry will need to rely increasingly on environmental audits. The need to carry out an environmental audit will vary depending upon the type of organisation and the objectives of the audit. The principal aims of an environmental audit are to identify and evaluate potential liabilities, risks and hazards. This in turn will assist in assessing the viability of operations after including the cost of reducing environmental risks and liability to acceptable levels.
    There is no single environmental audit procedure applicable to all situations. An audit can take different forms to achieve different objectives. The reason for undertaking an audit and the agreed outcomes are the deciding factors.



14/23
Mine Planning for Environment Protection. / Environment Protection Agency .--Brisbane : Environment Protection Agency, 1995.-- 28 p..- Serie: Best Practice Environmental Management in Mining
ISBN 0-642-19427-0
PROTECCION AMBIENTAL   PARTICIPACION COMUNITARIA   SUELOS   CONTAMINACION AMBIENTAL   GESTION AMBIENTAL   MEDIO AMBIENTE   DESARROLLO COMUNITARIO Categoría temática primaria DESARROLLO SOSTENIBLE   INDUSTRIA MINERA  
Categoría geográfica: AUSTRALIA  
Solicite el material por este código: BB-1270

    This module describes how environment protection can form a part of the planning and design of contemporary Australian mines with benefits to both the company and the community.
    This module demonstrates how environmental safeguards can be introduced to mines to make them acceptable to local communities, so they can co-exist with other land uses. The module outlines a range of environmental issues that are relevant to the planning of a modern mine. These include pollution prevention, waste minimisation controls, aspects of the biophysical environment and socio-economic issues.



15/23
Community Consultation and Involvement. / Environment Protection Agency .--Brisbane : Environment Protection Agency, 1995.-- 28 p..- Serie: Best Practice Environmental Management in Mining
ISBN 0-642-19421-1
COMUNIDADES LOCALES   PROTECCION AMBIENTAL   PARTICIPACION COMUNITARIA   GESTION AMBIENTAL   MINAS   DESARROLLO COMUNITARIO Categoría temática primaria DESARROLLO SOSTENIBLE   INDUSTRIA MINERA  
Categoría geográfica: AUSTRALIA  
Solicite el material por este código: BB-1271

    In today's mining industry consultation with the community has become a very important part of mining operations.
    Community consultation and involvement is a necessary part of the environment affected by an operation, but also because they can add sensitivities and information invaluable to achieving best practice.
    This module is a practical guide to the community consultation process. It will tell you what community consultation is, why it is necessary, what communities expect and need, and how a company can go about fulfilling those needs and expectations.



16/23
Environmental Impact Assessment. / Environment Protection Agency .--Brisbane : Environment Protection Agency, 1995.-- 28 p..- Serie: Best Practice Environmental Management in Mining
ISBN 0-642-19426-2
MINAS   PROTECCION AMBIENTAL   CONSERVACION AMBIENTAL   PROYECTOS AMBIENTALES   IMPACTO AMBIENTAL   INDUSTRIA MINERA Categoría temática primaria DESARROLLO SOSTENIBLE   MEDIO AMBIENTE  
Categoría geográfica: AUSTRALIA  
Solicite el material por este código: BB-1272

    This module gives an overview of best practice in environmental impact assessment in the mining industry. The aim is to foster best practice principles throughout the industry. The module draws on the experience of companies in Australia which already aspire to and use best practice.
    Environmental impact assessment (EIA), is the process in which environmental factors are integrated into project planning and decision making in a way that is consistent with ecologically sustainable development.
    EIA helps to protect the environment by looking at the likely environmental affects of projects. It helps the developer to minimise these in project construction, operation and decommissioning.



17/23
Enviromental Management Systems. / Environment Protection Agency .--Brisbane : Environment Protection Agency, 1995.-- 40 p..- Serie: Best Practice Environmental Management in Mining
ISBN 0-642-19422-X
GESTION AMBIENTAL   GERENCIA AMBIENTAL   IMPACTO AMBIENTAL   INDICADORES AMBIENTALES   MINAS   PROYECTOS AMBIENTALES Categoría temática primaria DESARROLLO SOSTENIBLE   MEDIO AMBIENTE  
Categoría geográfica: AUSTRALIA  
Solicite el material por este código: BB-1273

    The environment has been a major issue for mining companies for many years and its profile is increasing. Many companies are now directing their attention towards their own environmental performance and the potential impacts of their operations.
    A competently prepared environmental management system (EMS) is a useful tool, which may assist mine management to meet both current and future environmental requirements and challenges. It is a quality assurance system which can be used to review a company's operations against environmental performance indicators. Thus it helps the company to reach its environmental objectives and targets. An EMS provides a structured method offering management an improved view and control of the organization's environmental performance, that can be applied from planning and exploration through to mine closure.



18/23
Planning a Workforce Enviromantal Awareness Training Program. / Environment Protection Agency .--Brisbane : Environment Protection Agency, 1995.-- 36 p..- Serie: Best Practice Environmental Management in Mining
ISBN 0-642-19419-X
EDUCACION AMBIENTAL   EXPLOTACION PETROLERA   PROTECCION AMBIENTAL   GESTION AMBIENTAL   IMPACTO AMBIENTAL   INDUSTRIA DEL PETROLEO   INDUSTRIA MINERA Categoría temática primaria DESARROLLO SOSTENIBLE   MEDIO AMBIENTE  
Categoría geográfica: AUSTRALIA  
Solicite el material por este código: BB-1274

    This module identifies and promotes the principles of best practice in planning workforce environmental awareness training in the mining and petroleum industry. With increasing community demands and established needs for enhanced environment protection, environmental awareness is a major workforce training issue for this industry. Such training should establish an enduring and improving environmental culture that is demonstrated by positive environmental performance.
    Managers planning and delivering environmental awareness training can use the conceptual tools in the module to help them analyse their organization's training and awareness needs, and to help them identify best practice.



19/23
Tailings Containment. / Environment Protection Agency .--Brisbane : Environment Protection Agency, 1995.-- 36 p..- Serie: Best Practice Environmental Management in Mining
ISBN 0-642-19423-8
GERENCIA AMBIENTAL   CONTAMINACION AMBIENTAL   CONTAMINACION MINERA   PROTECCION AMBIENTAL   EXPLOTACION MINERA   INDUSTRIA MINERA Categoría temática primaria DESARROLLO SOSTENIBLE   GESTION AMBIENTAL  
Categoría geográfica: AUSTRALIA  
Solicite el material por este código: BB-1278

    Tailings storage areas are deposits of fine grained sediments containing various contaminants from mining and processing operations. These storage areas have to be engineered to optimise me amount of tailings stored, while avoiding potential environmental impacts to me satisfaction of government regulatory agencies, local interest groups, residents and me community generally (all stakeholders). Tailings storage can be highly contentious and a source of concern and conflict involving community, industry, and government. It is often a difficult task to resolve this to me satisfaction of all stakeholders.
    The primary aim in me past has been to provide a well-engineered structure into which me tailings can be deposited without a great deal of attention being given to closure requirements or issues related to long term management of me storage facility and me contaminants, particularly me environmental concerns. Increasingly mine operators are looking for alternative storage techniques to avoid me high initial construction costs and me post operational problems associated with me conventional dams. They are also concerned to avoid unfavourable environmental impacts.
    This module has been prepared to provide advice on Best Practice Environmental Management (BPEM) through the various stages of planning, design, operation and closure of tailings storage facilities. It is recognised that all tailings storage facilities will need to be designed and operated to accommodate site-specific constraints. Each situation is different and there is no simple means of ranking factors such as tailings and site selection characteristics, tailings dam construction and operational techniques to give a 'best' answer for tailings containment. The discussion in this module outlines these various aspects to consider in avoiding both short and long term environmental problems and achieving the best environmental results.



20/23
Enviromental monitoring and performance. / Environment Protection Agency .--Brisbane : Environment Protection Agency, 1995.-- 56 p..- Serie: Best Practice Environmental Management in Mining
ISBN 0-642-19428-9
PLANIFICACION AMBIENTAL   PROTECCION AMBIENTAL   RIESGO AMBIENTAL   EXPLOTACION MINERA   INDUSTRIA MINERA Categoría temática primaria DESARROLLO SOSTENIBLE   MEDIO AMBIENTE  
Categoría geográfica: AUSTRALIA  
Solicite el material por este código: BB-1284

    Today's society expects a level of environmental performance that can only be achieved through establishing a set of environmental quality objectives.
    These objectives are produced through mine planning for environmental protection, which includes environmental impact assessment (EIA) and community consultation processes. These processes are covered by separate modules in this series.
    The quality objectives underlie a comprehensive, reviewable environment management plan (EMP) for a minesite from its initial development to final decommissioning and rehabilitation.
    The EMP identifies risks to the environment from the mining operation and outlines strategies for managing these risks and minimising undesirable environmental impacts.
    Environmental monitoring provides the information for periodic review and alteration of the environment management plan as necessary, ensuring that environment protection is optimised at all stages of the development through best practice. In this way undesirable environmental impacts will be detected early and remedied effectively. It will also demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements.
    Monitoring programs are not generic. They must be designed and developed specifically for the individual minesite.
    Case studies which describe in detail the monitoring programs at bauxite, coal, mineral sands, iron ore, uranium, copper and gold mines are included.
    The basic requirements for planning water, land, biological, air, noise, process and waste, and community monitoring programs are described in detail. The monitoring program is designed to address environmental issues, me nature of potential impacts, pathways, receptors and me appropriate measurement and evaluation techniques.
    Environmental performance during mining is usually measured by mining companies and me results are verified by government authorities. This process provides feedback to refine the EMP and monitoring program. It also ensures mat the data gathered and presented are always focussed on key environmental issues. The process is vital to implementing best practice environmental management in mining, of which environmental monitoring is a key component.




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